Tea and cardiovascular disease

Tea inversely related to coronary heart disease risk

In 1985 the average consumption of black tea in the Zutphen men was approximately 3 cups per day. Elderly men who drank more than 4 cups of tea per day had a 60% lower risk of fatal CHD after 5 years of follow-up when compared to those who drank less than 2 cups of tea per day.

Higher tea consumption associated with lower stroke incidence

The average tea consumption in the period 1960-1970 was related to non-fatal and fatal stroke incidence over the next 15-years. Middle-aged men who drank on average at least 5 cups of tea per day had a 3 times lower stroke incidence than those who drank less than 2.5 cups per day. Potentially, the effects of tea on CHD and stroke might be due to its high content of flavonoids – compounds with potential beneficial properties.

More about the relationship between diet and CVD

Dietary patterns and all-cause mortality

Diets contain nutrients, and these are generally highly correlated with other factors due to the choice of foods in which they occur, but also on the consumption of a particular food at the expense of another one. These factors are taken into account when indicators of dietary patterns are evaluated.

Fiber and coronary heart disease

The results showed that every additional 10 g/d of recent dietary fiber intake was associated with a significantly lower risk of fatal CHD.

Optimism and cardiovascular disease

High optimism low CVD mortality Optimism was a relatively stable trait over 15 years in the Zutphen Elderly Study. Elderly men with a high [...]