All-cause mortality

All-cause mortality is a proxy variable for life expectancy. Low all-cause mortality is equivalent to a long life expectancy. All-cause mortality is an important quantitative indicator of quality of life and is strongly influenced by diet, lifestyle and risk factors. Some relationships seem obvious, like the relationship between a healthy diet and low all-cause mortality, while others are based on relatively recent scientific discoveries such as telomeres shorten with age.

Read about the various associations with all-cause mortality in the following articles:

Body mass index and all-cause mortality

Underweight and overweight related to all-cause mortality In the European cohorts of the SCS middle-aged men with a body mass index (BMI) <18.5 kg/m2 had a 2-fold [...]

Body mass index and all-cause mortality

Four lifestyle factors and all-cause mortality

A healthful diet and lifestyle are related to a low all-cause mortality risk A Mediterranean style diet, a high level of physical activity, non-smoking and moderate [...]

Four lifestyle factors and all-cause mortality

Loneliness and mortality in the Zutphen cohort of elderly men

Loneliness is prevalent in the elderly and included emotional and social loneliness. Information about loneliness was collected four times between 1985 and 2000. At baseline, 39% [...]

Loneliness and mortality in the Zutphen cohort of elderly men

Chronic diseases and all-cause mortality

The relations of different chronic diseases with all-cause mortality was studied from middle-age onwards in the Seven Countries Study and in old age in the FINE Study.

Chronic diseases and all-cause mortality

Telomeres and all-cause mortality

Longer telomeres at baseline did not predict all-cause mortality, even though telomere shortening is a marker of ageing that might be related to oxidative stress.

Telomeres and all-cause mortality