Fiber and coronary heart disease

High fiber associated with low CHD mortality

Every additional amount of 10 g/d of recently consumed fiber was associated with a significant 17% lower risk of fatal CHD during 40 years of follow-up. A non-significant 13% lower risk was observed for long-term fiber intake. A dietary fiber intake of more than 36 g/d at entry in 1960 was also associated with a 4 times lower risk of fatal CHD during 10 years of follow-up when compared to an intake of less than 20 g/d. However, this association became non-significant in multivariable analysis.

Dietary fiber intake in 1960 and 2000

Between 1960 and 2000 seven dietary surveys were carried out in the Zutphen Study. The average dietary fiber intake was 33 g/d in middle-aged men in 1960 and 21 g/d among survivors in 2000. The average energy intake amounted to 3100 kcal/d in 1960 and 2100 kcal/d in 2000.

More about the relationship between diet and CVD

Smoking and cardiovascular disease

An analysis using data from Seven Countries Study showed that CHD mortality was 5% higher in men who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day compared to those who never smoked.

Flavonols and cardiovascular disease

In 1993 it was found for the first time that a high intake of flavonols was associated with a 68% lower 5-year fatal CHD risk. This result was confirmed using 10-year mortality data.

Optimism and cardiovascular disease

High optimism low CVD mortality Optimism was a relatively stable trait over 15 years in the Zutphen Elderly Study. Elderly men with a high [...]